NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 853 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Trouble Breathing---Out

  1. #1
    QVC1212's Avatar
    QVC1212 is offline Banned Reason: Shilling
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    1,692
    QVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant future

    Default Trouble Breathing---Out

    I have a medical question which, as a former medic and medical "aficionado", should know or be able to research on my own. But I am not really in the mood to conduct research, and am more curious if there are any other respiratory experts or medical personnel on PR who can share their opinion.

    Today my sister had her open house and I was tasked with blowing up balloons. I grabbed my first one, and after exerting a great deal of effort, was able to blow up one about the half the size of the high school girl blowing up balloons next to me. The second one I grabbed, the first part of it blew up more easily and quickly (all in the first breath expelled) but no matter how hard I try, my cheeks only puffed out and made a funny noise. It was funny to everyone else. But not to me. It was very disturbing. Here I am, having quit smoking over a year and a half ago, only 31 years old, with an hour of aerobic exercise each day, and I can't blow up a simple balloon. Is something wrong with me? Should I be concerned.

    Needless to say, I found an excuse to walk away from the balloons without causing more embarrassment. I smoked for ten years, but I never thought that I had caused permanent damage. It has never hampered my ability to run, at least to the extent that I could judge it. In other words, subjectively, even while I was smoking, I was doing 5K and 10K fun runs. I always finished in respectable times, nothing like when I ran cross country in high school, but enough that I felt satisfied that my respiratory system wasn't compromised.

    When I worked in an acute care clinic in the hospital in the Army, people came in with a medical condition. I think it was emphysema. I could be wrong. But it was a condition in which patients had little or no trouble breathing in, but had a great deal of trouble expelling the air from their lungs. The force with which they could expel air was measured with a peak flow meter. I smoked at that time. We would test each other with these peak flow meters just for fun when no one was around, to make ourselves feel better, and just waste medical resources.

    The joke's on me. I'm afraid what that peak flow meter would show now. Has an ex-smoker out there had similar trouble blowing up balloons? Should I be worried enough to mention it at my next doc's appointment? I already have two problems to mention to my GP on the 23rd of June. Docs hate addressing multiple problems at the same visit. I'd really piss him off if I asked about a third problem. Hmmm. Have to think about this one.

  2. #2
    SW19power6's Avatar
    SW19power6 is online now Honorable Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast and anxiety land
    Posts
    337
    SW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really niceSW19power6 is just really nice

    Well, I am an ex smoker and way older than you and I had my dad living with me for his last 3 years and he had severe COPD and had smoked for many years, he gave it up too late and I saw him die of pneumonia. He was 87 so I think if he had not been a smoker he may have lived to 100.
    What's your problem now as a pretty young man.....can't say but I can't think that it's too serious yet.

    *This post was auto-merged. The following text was added 8 minutes after the last post:*

    Also QVC1212

    I am a retired RN so I have a bit of knowledge about respiratory problems as a whole, just not my personal experience with my father.

    You are young at 31 and I would be surprised if you had done major damage to your lungs.
    Last edited by SW19power6; 06-12-2011 at 08:40 PM.

  3. #3
    Bellavista44's Avatar
    Bellavista44 is offline Honorable Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Upper Mid USA
    Posts
    322
    Bellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the roughBellavista44 is a jewel in the rough

    @QVC1212. This is going to sound off-the-wall but don't quickly dismiss it unless you feel certain. When I was in labor, I my breathing was futile, My checks were blowing out. I broke blood vessels in my face but I wasn't accomplishing much. After all was said and done, I didn't use my diaphragm. My energy was exerted primarily neck on up. This may be unrelated but based on your description, it triggered a memory.
    Helpful QVC1212 Rated helpful
    Until you submit, self medicate

  4. #4
    Gup's Avatar
    Gup
    Gup is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    80
    Gup will become famous soon enoughGup will become famous soon enoughGup will become famous soon enoughGup will become famous soon enough

    Quote Originally Posted by QVC1212 View Post
    When I worked in an acute care clinic in the hospital in the Army, people came in with a medical condition. I think it was emphysema. I could be wrong. But it was a condition in which patients had little or no trouble breathing in, but had a great deal of trouble expelling the air from their lungs.
    That would be emphysema-type COPD ("Pink Puffers"). Main sign is severe shortness of breath while exercising -- that's how it usually begins, followed by a lowering of exercise threshold tolerated as the disease progresses. Not a problem at your age, but good that you quit smoking.
    Helpful QVC1212 Rated helpful

  5. #5
    northstar77 is offline Banned Reason: Multiple accounts and sending dubious PMs. Don't trust anything you read from this guy.
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Cali
    Posts
    505
    northstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to beholdnorthstar77 is a splendid one to behold

    @QVC1212 I was a smoker for 20 years, I have now quit for 7 years. I too had the same problem blowing up a balloon for my kids bday a couple years ago. It wasn't in front of anyone though, so I just told my kids to blow them up later that day. I am really sorry to hear this happened to you in front of people. I still run marathons every weekend and work out with no problems. Never had one problem since. I have never tried to blow one up since, but this makes me think its due to us smoking. This makes me want to go get a balloon to see if I could now. Don't know if this was any help but just letting you know your not the only one.
    Helpful QVC1212 Rated helpful

  6. #6
    alumni is offline Exalted Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    3,837
    alumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond repute
    alumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond reputealumni has a reputation beyond repute
    If this is a recent, new occurrence, I can relate a similar circumstance I was in recently.
    Like you, I work out regularly both aerobic and strength training. Even though I was excercising at the same pace, I suddenly found that my breathing was getting very labored in certain activities.
    Went to ER where they initially suspected pneumonia. It turned out to be a fairly large blood clot which had traveled from my leg to my lung (pulmonary embolism/thrombosis).
    Medication and my body fixed it in a couple of weeks but stayed on warfarin for 18 months.
    You might want to investigate this possible cause for yourself.
    Helpful QVC1212, Magician Rated helpful

  7. #7
    MattMar's Avatar
    MattMar is offline Honorable Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    278
    MattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the rough

    I smoked for many years, stopped about 20 years ago. I have asthma and allergies. Problems with breathing out can also happen with asthma but usually it would accompany problems breathing in. Anyway, when I went to my allergist, he always had me use a peak meter. My readings varied quite a bit. As far as I know I don't have emphazema or COPD. Allergies can constrict the lungs (I get hayfever).

  8. #8
    QVC1212's Avatar
    QVC1212 is offline Banned Reason: Shilling
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    1,692
    QVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant futureQVC1212 has a brilliant future

    @MattMar I have bad allergies too. I use flonase and zyrtec, and it only partially controls it. To really stop the drainage, I just about have to triple or quadruple the dosage and/or use multiple meds (allegra plus zyrtec plus claritin). I can never completely stop it. Part of it is from damage to the nose from drug abuse many years ago.

    Damn smoking. You know I went about 2.5 years without picking up a cig, then a few days ago I had an overpowering craving for a cigarette. Bought a pack, smoked it in 3 days. Now I want a cigarette again. (SIGH) Is the battle with addiction ever really over? Maybe when you're dead I guess. At least my breathing problem hasn't gotten any worse.

  9. #9
    bUrke is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    74
    bUrke will become famous soon enough

    IMHo I believe it has something to do with your past of smoking and possibly lack of aerobic and cardiovascular exercise.. You should speak with your doctor about it, it might end up being a lung infection of some sort or something serious, but i doubt it.. Good luck. =D

  10. #10
    MattMar's Avatar
    MattMar is offline Honorable Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    278
    MattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the roughMattMar is a jewel in the rough

    @QVC1212 I used flonase - it did help but I lost insurance and dropped it. I always have some nasal blockage no matter what I try.

    Thanks for your smoking bit- sorry you picked up again however it's a great reminder to me how powerful smoking is. And yes, addiction is powerful and I don't think it ever goes away. If only there was a pill for that, what a fortune one could make!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1


    Quote Originally Posted by QVC1212 View Post
    I have a medical question which, as a former medic and medical "aficionado", should know or be able to research on my own. But I am not really in the mood to conduct research, and am more curious if there are any other respiratory experts or medical personnel on PR who can share their opinion.

    Today my sister had her open house and I was tasked with blowing up balloons. I grabbed my first one, and after exerting a great deal of effort, was able to blow up one about the half the size of the high school girl blowing up balloons next to me. The second one I grabbed, the first part of it blew up more easily and quickly (all in the first breath expelled) but no matter how hard I try, my cheeks only puffed out and made a funny noise. It was funny to everyone else. But not to me. It was very disturbing. Here I am, having quit smoking over a year and a half ago, only 31 years old, with an hour of aerobic exercise each day, and I can't blow up a simple balloon. Is something wrong with me? Should I be concerned.

    Needless to say, I found an excuse to walk away from the balloons without causing more embarrassment. I smoked for ten years, but I never thought that I had caused permanent damage. It has never hampered my ability to run, at least to the extent that I could judge it. In other words, subjectively, even while I was smoking, I was doing 5K and 10K fun runs. I always finished in respectable times, nothing like when I ran cross country in high school, but enough that I felt satisfied that my respiratory system wasn't compromised.

    When I worked in an acute care clinic in the hospital in the Army, people came in with a medical condition. I think it was emphysema. I could be wrong. But it was a condition in which patients had little or no trouble breathing in, but had a great deal of trouble expelling the air from their lungs. The force with which they could expel air was measured with a peak flow meter. I smoked at that time. We would test each other with these peak flow meters just for fun when no one was around, to make ourselves feel better, and just waste medical resources.

    The joke's on me. I'm afraid what that peak flow meter would show now. Has an ex-smoker out there had similar trouble blowing up balloons? Should I be worried enough to mention it at my next doc's appointment? I already have two problems to mention to my GP on the 23rd of June. Docs hate addressing multiple problems at the same visit. I'd really piss him off if I asked about a third problem. Hmmm. Have to think about this one.

    Great article.

    Thanks.

Similar Threads

  1. I have found help for those breathing out!
    By flyer in forum Archive for unanswered posts
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-21-2012, 10:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Protected by Copyscape CopySentry. Do not copy.